The Origin of Thanksgiving

 

Thanksgiving the true American “Holy-day” where families gather all over the country to celebrate brotherhood, love, family, and God. Just as the pilgrims did when they first arrived in Plymouth and met the Indians. As we all know, the Indians were so caring and giving on that harsh winter when the poor pilgrims didn’t have anything to eat… NOT! Within Thanksgiving lie bloodshed, deception, oppression, massacre, and genocide. This day of remembrance is everything but thankful and giving. You can date back Thanksgiving, or better said the time of harvest, back to the pagan religions and rituals. My focus however, will be solely on the holy-day we call Thanksgiving.

The Mayflower wasn’t the first ship to land on Massachusetts, nor were the pilgrims the first to encounter the natives of this land. Years before there was another voyage that visited the shores of America in pursue of slaves who they found were the Pawtuxet in which they gathered and brought back to Europe. They left something behind though; smallpox, which was passed on to domestic animals and the natives. The natives weren’t immune to this disease, so it spread quick and killed most of them. One of the natives that were captured was Tisquantum better known as Squanto who on his long and strenuous journey through Europe, learned their language and customs. He became an assessment to the Englishmen so instead of making him a slave he became an interpreter, and wherever they sailed he was sure to be. One of the journeys brought him back to Massachusetts, where upon landing Squanto was hoping to see his people, but they were all wiped out by the smallpox. That first year was grueling for the pilgrims; they had no food and no water, which led them into looting and stealing from other close by tribes. When colonies were built the first thing they did was build a high fence to keep the natives out, that’s what they called a plantation. While all of this was happening Squanto befriended Chief Massasoit of the Wampanoung nation. The chief knew of the struggles of the Pilgrims, but he also knew of the atrocities that they brought. So a treaty had to be signed between both parties. The treaty was about trade, and no war between them, so when you see the picture with the Indians and Pilgrims sitting together a treaty was being discussed.

Thanksgiving in the United States is a part of this tradition that celebrates the subjugation of non-Western people for colonial purposes. Its roots are more directly connected to the events that occurred when 700 men, women, and children of the Pequot Tribe, gathered for their “Annual Green Corn Dance”.  Led by John Mason, the Indigenous people were ordered from their ceremonial structures and as they came forth, they were shot down. The rest were burned alive in their homes.  Englishman John Mason declared a day of Thanksgiving, praising God for their sacrifice. In 1704 Governor Dudley declared  a “General Thanksgiving” not to celebrate brotherhood but for: God’s infinite goodness to extend his favors…In defeating and disappointing the expeditions of the enemy[Indians] against us, and good success given us against them, by delivering so many of them into our hands.

In 2004 the NY times had an article regarding a law that was written in 1675 which was never repealed by the state of Massachusetts.  The law prohibited Native Americans from entering the city of Boston for fear members of their “barbarous crew” would cause residents to be “exposed to mischief.” The Boston City Council, which in April 2003 unanimously passed a resolution calling for repeal, must now approve the petition to remove the ban. The repeal must then pass the legislature and be signed by Gov. Mitt Romney.

It was little coincidence that Mr. Menino signed the petition the day before Thanksgiving. The podium at the news conference was decorated with a splash of crimson chrysanthemums, and the desk Mr. Menino used to sign the petition was festooned with a pumpkin and other gourds. An Indian leader also invoked the holiday. During March 1623 Myles Standish lured two Chiefs to a meeting then murdered them. The picture of the monument, erected by the Weymouth Historical Commission, depicts how the town of Weymouth, Mass, takes pride and give thanks in his barbaric deed.

This was written for people to see that history isn’t always what it’s portrayed to be. Sure I’ll take in the festivities of Thanksgiving and watch football, drink some beers, and eat with friends and family but I’ll never partake in any historical events, nor will I allow my children to. Thanksgiving is a hoax, and a sacrilegious day.

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  • guest

    Great piece of info! But it was  Prince Henry Sinclair in 1398, who brought over the black death when he first landed in Canada. He worked his way down the coastline. There is a marker in Westford Mass that they carved. http://kingcrest.com/sinclair/landmarks.html-ssi. But your article is really good and infomative! thanks for writing it!

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  • Adrian

    Thomas Hunt is actually the name of the person who captured
    Squanto, if you read the article you would see no actual name is
    mentioned except that it was a European as it’s hard to pin point
    whether Hunt was Spanish or English. Also Squanto goes on to travel to
    many countries in Europe, further not allowing to pinpoint who took him
    the Spanish or British. As the Spanish we also already in America in
    what is now Florida.

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  • Jovemfla

    True the Conquistadors were here way before the english they worked there way up from the yucatan peninsula, the natives had been encountering the European hundreds of years before the pilgrims.

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  • ThETrUTh

    Great Article. It is full of information. Thank you for sharing!!

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